How To Make Cornhole Boards | Lightweight Design | DIY

in this video I'm gonna show you how to make some lightweight cornhole boards [Music] hey everyone my name is Tim tug nachi and welcome back to another episode of casual builds the channel focused on bringing you beginner DIY and woodworking projects so before we get started on today's build I just wanted to cover two quick things in order to build this cornhole set you'll need four eight foot long two by fours two sheets of plywood and the plywood that I got is half-inch and they are two feet by four feet and for the hardware you'll need some carriage bolts some washers some wing nuts and some handles so I am making this cornhole set for a buddy of mine I have some myself but they're just a little bit too heavy so I'm going to see if there's ways that I can just make slight adjustments to the overall design but still adhering to the regulations set by the American cornhole Association I will leave a link to the Sketchup file that I used down in the video description below so make sure you go and check that out oh and make sure you stay tuned until the end of the video because I will be taking the set that I already have and I will weigh them against the set that I just made to see if in fact they are any lighter and now without further ado let's just jump into the project in order to maximize our material we'll be making three separate cuts on each 2×4 I first began by taking each 2×4 over to the miter saw trim the ends measured out 48 inches set on my stop block and then I made the four cuts [Music] next I grab the material I had left over from those cuts and repeated the same process as before but this time cutting each piece down to 21 inches instead you should have some material left after making these cuts be sure to save them because we'll be using them later on for the leg pieces my first idea to help decrease the overall weight was to trim off the rounded edges of the two by fours and bring the width down from three and a half inches to three inches to do this I brought all the pieces over to my table saw set my fence to about three and a quarter and ripped one side of each piece I later came back set my fence to three inches and made my final cut with all the pieces cut down to their final dimensions I sanded everything down to 120 grit I'll be doing some more sanding later on but it's easier to get this step out of the way first before I start the assembly process at each end of the 48 inch long pieces I marked the location for the screws three quarters of an inch from each end and each side after that I used my screw hole punch and drilled some holes using a 5/8 inch Forstner bit after I screw everything together I'll come back with a matching dowel piece to plug the holes now it's time to attach the frame I laid everything out on my workbench and clamp the pieces together since we'll be cutting rabbits along the top and dropping in the plywood it's super important that everything is square i pre-drilled the holes then screwed all the pieces together with two and a half inch exterior screws once that was done I came back again to make sure everything was square next I grabbed my router and a half inch rabbeting bit to cut a rabbet in the top of the 2×4 frame I made this cut in two passes make sure you set the depth on the second pass to equal the thickness of the half inch plywood so it sits flush with the frame the router will leave rounded corners so I used a chisel to square those up now it's time to drop in the plywood but first we'll need to measure out the opening after grabbing those dimensions I took the plywood over to the table saw and cut it down to its final length and width unless your frame was perfectly square and you nailed the cuts on the first try you may need to take the plywood back to the table saw and take a few more passes so it sits in the frame just right I then applied some glue type on three to be specific to the frame dropped in the plywood and then secured it with Brad nails the next step was to cut out the hole this needs to be a 6-inch diameter hole set 9 inches from the top and 12 inches from the side on center I marked out the location and used my compass to trace the circle to cut out the hole I wanted something a bit more accurate than using a jig saw so I grabbed my router and a quarter inch straight pin my thought was that if I line up the router bit to the circle and grab the measurement from the edge of the base plate in the center of the hole I could find a circular object that matched the distance and run the router around it after looking through my workshop in the house for something circular with an inch and a half in diameter I unexpectedly found something that worked perfectly this bottle cap I drill the hole in the center of the bottle cap and screwed it into the center of the circle I made a few passes around it with my router and then knocked out the circle [Music] before moving on to working on the legs I softened up the hard edges of the hole with a round over bit plug the screw holes in the frame with dowels and use some wood filler to hide any gaps between the plywood top and the frame I'm not gonna lie assembling the leg pieces was probably the most tedious part of this project I ran into a few issues but I'm going to show you what ended up working the best for me if you have any other ideas please share them in the comments below I grabbed the leftover pieces of two by fours from earlier and ripped them down at the table saw to about two and a half inches this is so they can fit underneath the board's remember we cut the frame to three inches and then dropped in a half inch sheet of plywood next I set the legs perpendicular to the frame and used a pencil to mark a line where they met then using a straightedge I made a cross to find the center point using a 3/8 inch bit on my drill press I drilled through the leg pieces then I used a pencil to transfer the hole on the leg piece to the frame and drill the hole using a small bit the carriage bolts that I bought weren't long enough so I used a one inch Forstner bit to countersink the bolt and then I used a 3/8 inch bit to screw all the way through for the bolt you'll want to round over the ends of the leg pieces as well pay no close attention to these next clips I film these process shots before I knew what I was doing in the bolt attach a washer and then the wig nut we'll need to cut the legs to their final length to do this we'll prop up the board so the backs it's 12 inches off the ground pull out the legs and transfer over a line so you know where to cut them there are a few ways that you can make this angled cut and that wraps up the assembly for the set next is onto finishing which includes sanding everything down applying some primer two coats of paint and two coats of water-based polyurethane [Music] [Music] oh and the handles too and now for the final test let's go ahead and weigh each of the cornhole boards the set that I just made and the set that I already have to see if I actually trimmed off a little bit away we shall see [Music]

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